Pledge India
The India Pledge is a commitment to change food and beverage advertising to
children under the age of 12 years in India.
Media

Companies roll-out changes in advertising 1st January onwards

‘We’ll Be Good,’ FMCG Majors Promise Kids...

Nine of the biggest global F&B brands have taken it upon themselves to become more responsible while advertising to children. This forward-looking step may be viewed in the backdrop of the pledge on ‘India Policy on Marketing Communications to Children’ published in 2016 by the Food and Beverage Alliance of India or FBAI (an alliance of brands including Coca-Cola India, Mars, General Mills, Mondelez International, Pepsico, Kellogg’s, Nestle, Ferrero and Hindustan Unilever Ltd (HUL), under the patronage of a global self-regulatory alliance of foods and beverage companies. The brands were given time till December 31, 2017 to make the requisite changes in their products, as well as communication.
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‘India’s Common Nutrition Criteria Are One Of The Most Robust In The World’

Will Gilroy, Director of Public Affairs and Communications, World Federation of Advertisers talks to Samarpita Banerjee about why the pledge, and the development of a ‘Common Nutrition Criteria’ will go a long way in making food advertising to children more responsible.
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Advertising to children, discussions in Parliament

Government Recognizes Voluntary Initiative by Food Companies (FBAI) In Parliament

Government Recognizes Voluntary Initiative by Food Companies (FBAI) In Parliament

On 8th February 2018, Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting – Shri. Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore, cited the voluntary initiate undertaken by the nine member companies of FBAI.
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Will Banning Junk Food Advertisements for children work? Here Are Some Answers..

Addressing Parliament, the government said "food businesses could be asked to voluntarily desist from advertising high fat, sugar and salt foods on children's channels".
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Industries won’t show junk food ads on children channels: Government

Industry bodies like Food and Beverage Alliance of India “have already decided to voluntarily restrict food and beverage advertisements concerning children,” Irani said. Nine major food business operators have joined the campaign, she said.
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No proposal to ban junk food advertisements on television: Govt

Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore told the Lok Sabha during Question Hour that bodies like the Food and Beverage Alliance of India (FBAI) have already decided to voluntarily restrict food and beverage advertisements concerning children.

I&B Ministry is not planning to ban television ads of junk food, Smriti Irani tells Lok Sabha

In a written reply, Union Information and Broadcasting Minister Smriti Irani told the Lok Sabha that nine major food business companies had decided not to advertise products with high fat, salt or sugar on children's channels. Minister of State Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore told the Lok Sabha that industry bodies such as the Food and Beverage Alliance of India have voluntarily decided to restrict food and beverage advertisements targeted at children.
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Govt says no proposal to ban junk food advertisements on television

Putting speculations to rest, the government today said there was no proposal at present to ban advertisements of junk food on television. Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore told the Parliament that bodies like the Food and Beverage Alliance of India have already decided to voluntarily restrict food and beverage advertisements concerning children.
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NDA govt denies proposal to ban junk food advertisements on television

Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore said in Lok Sabha during Question Hour that Food and Beverage Alliance of India (FBIA) voluntarily pitched in to exclude food and beverage advertisements taking into cognizance of children.
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No Proposal To Ban Junk Food Ads On Tv: Smriti Irani

Childhood obesity is a rising problem in India. The issue was addressed in today's Lok Sabha session when a reply was sought from the Minister of Information and Broadcasting Smriti Irani on whether the government is aware of the study that correlates watching ads on TV with increasing habit of eating junk and if there is a proposal to impose a ban on telecast of junk food and cold/soft drinks advertisements on television.
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India could ban junk food and cola ads on children’s TV

"The expert Group in its report said the food companies could be asked to voluntarily desist from advertising HFSS foods on childrens' channels. Bodies like Food and Beverage Alliance of India (FBIA) have already decided to voluntarily restrict food and beverage advertisements concerning children," the ministry said.
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Measures Being Taken For Couch-Potato Kids: Rathore

Responding to supplementaries during Question Hour, Minister of State For Information & Broadcasting Rajyavardhan Rathore said to curb the habit eating more junk food was increasing among people by watching advertisements on television.
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Interesting reads

Think tank: Ban celebrities from plugging high-sugar, high-salt foods

Celebrities should be banned from endorsing unhealthy foods, while adverts for items like soft drinks should be scrapped, according to experts.
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Food and Beverage Alliance policy guidelines are a good step, but India's public health framework is a worry

In July, 2016, the Food and Beverage Alliance of India (FBAI) published a pledge by all its member companies, under the patronage of a global self-regulatory alliance of foods and beverage companies on 'India's Policy on Marketing Communications to Children'. Keeping in line with this pledge, several top food and beverage corporate brands such as Kellogg, Pepsi-Co, Mondelez India, Nestle and Coca-Cola, are preparing for the 31 December deadline for halting all advertisements of products directed at children below 12 years of age. This policy could, in many ways, completely change the ways in which the largest foods brands in the country are promoted. Moreover, it could also mean enormous changes in the public health landscape of the country.
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Come new year, F&B companies to junk ads targeted at children

NEW DELHI: Top food and beverage makers are gearing up to meet the December 31 deadline for stopping all advertising of products to children below 12 years of age, a move that could involve changes to the way some of the biggest foods brands in the country are promoted.
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No more food and beverages ads aimed at children, here's why

Food and beverages players are meeting on December 31 to mull over the policy on stopping all advertisements of food products catering to children younger than 12. This move can change the way some biggest players in the industry advertise their products.
This move is planned is in line with a pledge by the Food and Beverage Alliance of India (FBAI) under the aegis of a global self-regulatory alliance of foods and beverage companies.
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